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On what grounds may I base my California divorce?

Marriage creates a legal bond between two people who otherwise do not share a familial connection. In California and other jurisdictions throughout the country, marriage allows individuals to enjoy certain rights that include but are not limited to sharing in property rights between partners, having rights to certain tax benefits, and establishing inheritance rights when the partners pass away. Because marriage creates so many opportunities for individuals to intertwine their legal rights and lives together, the state takes a serious interest in the process of bring a marriage to its end.

Marriages end through divorce. Divorce breaks the legal bond between the partners and reestablishes them as single individuals. One or both of the partners to a marriage may choose to file for divorce, and in California a divorce filing is based on one of two no fault grounds. This post will explore the no fault grounds of irreconcilable differences.

Irreconcilable differences in a marriage generally refer to disagreements the partners cannot overcome and that have led to the breakdown of the marital relationship. If there is a chance that the partners will find a way to work out their problems then a court may choose to delay approving a divorce; readers who wish to learn more about the timeline of a divorce in California are encouraged to speak with their personal family law attorneys.

Since fault grounds like adultery, cruelty, and imprisonment that exist in other states do not serve as bases for divorce in California, the grounds of irreconcilable differences takes on a very broad meaning for those who wish to reach the end of a marriage. Readers of this post are invited to use the information provided here as a place to begin their divorce research but should not rely on its contents as specific legal advice.

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